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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of changes there. our road map this morning starts with the latest in the fiscal cliff negotiations. the white house promptly rebuffs the gop counterproposal which calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue but without tax rate increases for the wealthy. could this tax issue deadlock the talks? >>> bank of america ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up and oracle will play out three-quarters of dividends this year. >>> more strength in housing this morning. toll brothers earnings top expectations. we'll begin with the fiscal cliff. governors are set to meet today with the president and congressional leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgebu. the latest gop offer would overhaul the tax code, raise $800 billion in new revenue but seek $600 billion in health savings, net savings add up to about $2.2 trillion over ten years. boehner called the white house's original offer la la land and it does appear that eve
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has b
the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less social security and they pay more for their medicare? it meets the president's animus that we must get more mone
of job growth. a fiscal cliff go over -- >> snatching victory from the jaws. >> a superstorm. nothing can stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers c
different direction from the fiscal cliff and talk more about long-term and medium-term economic realities we face. in your written testimony to this committee, you warned against kicking the can down the road indefinitely because of the adverse effect that might have on the economy. the medium and long-term impact it might have. i thought your analysis was definitely something we need to pay attention to. as you observed in the failure to make progress in this area now could signal that we have bigger troubles ahead. the moody's analytics model that you used breaks down about 2028. the reason it does that because at that point, the interest on our national debt will start to cripple our economy. we will be left without much recourse. i'm not sure there is a tax increase on the planet that could suddenly fix that. i'm not sure we could print money fast enough. if we did, we would go the way of argentina. i tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where it is. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanc
-called fiscal cliff. >> this weekend on c-span3's "american history tv," follow harry truman's eldest son, as they prepared to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb on 1945. >> i know everyone has their own view. i don't want to argue survival. i think we're past that. i want to do what i can to see that this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we'r
negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whatever kind of framework, hopefully comes out of the fiscal cliff to their committees to help develop the details of how to do entitlement reform and tax reform. so we are very like you have with us today chairmen bockius who is somebody who's been thinking about these ideas for quite some time, hazard immense amount of expertise and will talk to us today about where the situation stands and where hopefully we will be able to move from there. thank you so much, senator. [applause] >> thank you very much, maya. thank everyone here for fix the debt, putting the fix to get conference together. this is an interesting senate. have my back to all these a luminaries here. i don't know whether there will be darts in my back or spitballs, whatever it's going to be, but it's good to be here and try to help any way i can. i first w
broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, halting employment growth, driving unemployment up instead of down, triggering a deep cuts to programs that families across the country count on. the job before the united states congress is to reach an agreement that builds on the economic progress that we are making, and puts us on a path to fiscal stability. we need to cut more spending, and generate more revenue. we need to do it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has p
to this extraordinary country that we inherited. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff-type scenario that created the scenario and ridiculous idea that i voted against, put a bunch of things bad to happen at one time. surprise, it didn't work and we are facing this. there are two issues number one, avoid doing damage and avoid doing harm. and we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short-term. and we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write o
on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and here is the song we sing to our twin boys actually about two years ago we went in to sing them to sleep with this lull by and we got the guitar out and sat down on the side of the bed and we were about to play the opening cords and rough fuss looked up at me and said you know dad, we don't have to do this anymore. ♪ ♪ >> good buy and thank you very much. >> among the iletms on the agenda next week appointing members to a committee to hash out an agreement it was defense bill next year. the house planned to adjourn for the holidays next week but the house will be back in session december 17 to deal with the s
're fiscal cliff cliff fatigued to death. it's a real turnoff and we know it, but i want to address the issue in big picture terms with you because you're big picture thinker. i think at the end of the day we will have higher taxes on wealthy people, promises to cut spending somewhere down the road and don't worry about the debt, ignore it it. i think that's the outline of a big picture deal. what do you say? >> i sort of agree, stuart. there will be higher taxes. i do think the republicans will extract a couple of entitle reformat. a new way to calculate the cost of living adjustment and social security, maybe a higher payment by beneficiaries who are wealthier in medicare and finally the last point you make is the really intriguing one, that's the debt ceiling. and my hunch is the republicans will cave on taxes and they'll come back to fight again later in the winter on the debt ceiling and they could really extract major spending cuts by late winter. >> so you don't think the president will get the blank check that he wants, no debt ceiling? he wants no debt ceiling, you don't think he'll
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security trust insolvent five years sooner than they would if he did not have high oil prices. america needs jobs and gr
the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vote on the senate-passed legislation. what was once a trickle has become more of a flood. last week republican representative tom cole said it was time to give middle-class families certainty their taxes won't go up by $2,200 on average on january 1. then tim scott from north carolina ad admitted that the senate-passed tax cut will surely pass the house since it will take only 26 republican ren votes for passage. i don't most of the time agree with david brooks but no one can dispute this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
of why we are here, none of you who claim to be here. we are here debating a fiscal cliff. we're here debating direction of america, we were going to go financially. very responsible ability as members of congress. we are the stewards of public funding. it's rightfully have this hearing again and i vitiated. in december when i came, at least a couple issues. we want to invest in infrastructure. one america to move quickly in the best ways possible. what you want from you also need a plan for her. if the networks, a planned test it, it's an audited in a plan that has a review. i happen to come from california. the happiness in the area and many of you talk about. it's part of where it began. i have ruled out of viability, cost and with them and come in this will ever that is why i joined the chairman, mr. denham, mr. miller at the gao, asking for an audit and review of the business plan in california. a look forward to hearing testimony later through corporatists completed. today it has been billions of dollars. as concerns about the business plan itself an equally concerning to me jus
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)